commitment

Yoga – You have nothing to loose, everything to gain

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flexibleWhen we set aside all the modern perceptions we have attached to yoga such as it makes you more flexible, develops core, helps you to lose weight, calms you down and we strip back the images of yoga is associated with the East, incense, chanting and mystical gurus, we are left with a system that is truly amazing in making you astute, strong and incredibly tactile on a physical, mental and emotional level. Here is why:

YOGA IS A WORK OUT

Many people are surprised that they can build up a sweat during a yoga class. It is not the same as the one you develop during a gym session lifting weights and running on a treadmill, but it is an intense sweat that tells you have done something much deeper and profound to your body. Most yogis will tell you also that they don’t know how to explain this phenomenon, but despite the stiff and sore muscles two days later they overall feel amazing, alive and much more connected to themselves. They find inner strength in their practice and I have many yogis who would tell me that if they skip a week of yoga they can feel it, physically, mentally and emotionally. So what is happening?

SO, WHAT’S THE BIG DEAL?

Why has this 5,000 year old science suddenly become so popular?

Yoga does a lot more for the body than most people realize, it is not just about increasing flexibility or developing a calm mind. It is not necessary to sit in the crossed legged lotus position, chant OM, or be able to put your legs behind your head (but it does make for a very cool party trick!).

Practicing yoga:

  • develops strength and endurance,
  • enhances your focus,
  • improves your balance, and
  • increases your performance in every aspect of your life

It works the whole body synergistically, working every joint, muscle and fibre improving all of your bodies functions.

Yoga is the best medicine for preventing injuries and aiding muscle recovery and repair. When the muscles and surrounding tissues are lengthened and relaxed during yoga asana it creates more room for blood to flow. And increased blood flow carries vital healing energies to those injured and inflamed parts of your body, thus accelerating healing.

This in turn attracts more oxygen to the area helping muscles to heal and grow, making them more effective for your next workout (and less sore in everyday life). As an added bonus yoga also helps to flush lactic acid from the system. The squeezing and releasing motions the yoga postures create invite the good stuff in and push the bad stuff out.

Practicing yoga also increases your range of motion (ROM) which is beneficial for all activities allowing you to swing further, reach higher, dip lower, step wider etc. With this increased ROM it is easy to see how you would be able to put more power and explosiveness behind your movements. With increase in muscle elasticity on top of this you are going to decrease you risk of injury tenfold.

BULK VERSUS TOTAL BODY CONSCIOUSNESS

Weight training and cardiovascular activity such as running tightens and shortens the muscles while yoga lengthens and builds functional strength. It teaches you how to use this strength effectively – look at an average yoga class, there are bodies of Vata, Pitta and Kapha, but they can all do more or less the same things you would throw at them during a standard yoga class. In a gym it is much more varied, some tiny body just can’t lift the same weights that a big bulky one can. But in a yoga class that same tiny body and that same bulky body will be able to do the same balance or stretch you throw at them. And this is what makes yoga so appealing and amazing, it is literally for every body!

What is the point of having all this strength if you can’t use it? The level of concentration needed to maintain balancing postures also gives you a great lesson in focus and the importance of having a calm mind.

WHY DOESN’T STATIC STRETCHING ACHIEVE THIS RESULT?

Yoga is different from other modes of stretching because it works on full muscle groups and not just isolated muscles, bringing all the little supporting muscles into the game as well. During your study of Anatomy, we have seen that many asanas can be used to help the neck, shoulder as well as the hip for example. A single asana can focus on 3 or 4 major muscles groups and work them as once. It is like opera, if you get 4 people to just speak, it will be chaotic, but is you add a tune and a piano for example they can sing that same dialogue in complete harmony to the ear. The same with yoga, the asana is the tune and adds the harmony needed by the body to make different muscles work together in great synchronicity.

Not only does yoga decrease the risk of injury it also can increase your muscle endurance and pain threshold. In yoga you learn correct breathing techniques that teach you how to have better control of your oxygen intake, monitoring the inhalations and exhalations allowing you to use the breath more efficiently as well as using it to move through pain.

CONCLUSION

Along with all the benefits you will gain physically it is also important to mention the mental clarity and focus gained from a regular yoga practise. Jumping on the mat allows you to draw the senses inwards for awhile and regain your composure and sense of self. It puts you back in touch with what is true for you and allows you to reassess where you are, and to start fresh every day.

It teaches you to work with what you have on that day because everyday the body has something different to offer and to teach. By coming more in touch with your body you are able to work with it, not against it. When you can hear what the body needs you are able to work together to go beyond your boundaries in a way you never considered before.

Personally for me one of the great benefits of yoga is that it teaches us to be present in the moment. I have done this many times in a class, I would ask my yogis to do an asana, usually a balancing one as it demonstrates this principle in yoga best, I would ask them to really concentrate, think, breath and then do it and hold the asana. The result is stunning everybody in the class is able to hold the balance in a steady manner for an extended time. I would bring them out, ask them to feel what they have done and then ask them to do the asana again. But this time as they start to hold the asana I would ask them to think about their day, problems at work or home and suddenly the whole class starts to fall apart! And this is the beauty of yoga, it teaches us that we can be in the moment, that it does help us to set our day and problems aside for a moment and that we can attain inner strength and tenacity from our practice.

So instead of asking me why you should be doing yoga perhaps I should ask you why you are not doing yoga. What have you got to lose?

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Bhakti Yoga is your commitment

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When you read this article, you most most probably know that Bhakti Yoga refers to your devotion to the Divine or the Self. However, I want to place the emphasis of this article on that very important aspect called devotion and its meaning in yoga. Without devotion most people will start their yoga practise, but by month three or earlier, nearly a third has just disappeared, they have lost their commitment, will, discipline and drive to continue and to persist on the yoga path, in short they have lost their devotion or they weren’t devoted at all in any case from the beginning.

Devotion or to be devoted to something or somebody implies a certain commitment and discipline that goes with this devotion. Without this commitment to your God, deity, teacher, master or guru your yoga will be pointless and just another set of exercises. Devotion is the umbrella under which all the other yogas operate. Devotion therefore refers to the cultivation of ones own ideals, goals and principles and to stick to them no matter what. Devotion is the glue that will hold it all together, it is your inspiration and motivation to seek deeper and to eventually discover who AM I. Devotion is the lifting of the veil of maya, the removal of the illusion of the self and the ultimate discovery of the I AM THAT I AM.

Without commitment very little will happen and failure on the yoga path is inevitable for most people. Devotion teaches the individual to persist, to cultivate endurance and allow the Soul to flourish in the face of this commitment to your Path. You also need Bhakti or devotion to realise the other yogas, without devotion there would not be the individual resolve to stick to ones Path, whatever that may be. Therefore, Bhakti becomes the activator for all the other yogas, it is the precursor that lead the way and allow the Soul to express It-Self in an orderly and disciplined way.

For many aspirants on the yoga path, Bhakti is one of the most difficult yogas to perform as we live in an age where many individuals shun discipline and commitment. There is a generation who dislikes this aspect of devotion. However, sufficient orientation towards devotion and its related commitment and discipline will supply the serious aspirant and yogi with the necessary endurance and resolve to stick to their chosen path and to complete their sadhana with great success and efficacy.  Connected to Bhakti are the Yamas and Niyamas. By practicing the Yamas and Niyams, the yogi reinforces his/her commitment, discipline and resolve  to his/her Path. By observing and applying these right observances and actions, Bhakti cultivates persistence and willpower, which will lead the individual yogi to greater integration between the mind and the Self. It is then that your Yoga becomes more than just a set of asanas or that your pranayama becomes more than just another breath you take, you become Yoga.

Blessings and Om’s to those on this Path of Yoga.