teaching

The importance of a Beginner’s or Foundation Class

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Beginners-YogaThis weekend at a lunch invitation at the table the conversation turned to what you do as there were a few new faces around the table. I am  yoga teacher and chef, I explained and the immediate response as usual is firstly disbelief, I am a kapha body and most can’t imagine me doing even a forward bend and then follow the “yes, I always wanted to do yoga, where do I start?”

And, my advice is always the same, find a good beginner’s or foundation Hatha yoga class where the class is sympathetic to you and your body, go with an open mind and heart and stick to it for at least 3 months before you decide yoga is not for you.

Invariably, they don’t always listen.

Instead …

Most decide that they can’t make the designated beginner’s class as the time slot don’t suit them or some other excuse and they go to an intermediate or advance hot Bikram or Asthanga class and walk away wondering why anybody ever subjects her/himself to that kind of torture.

Others find an intermediate or advanced class, go and go until it’s not entirely torture anymore, but inevitably develop bad habits like holding sloppy postures or taking shortcuts. Bad habits lead to injury, injury leads to disillusionment, and disillusionment leads to skulking back to the gym classes with a completely wrong impression of what yoga is supposed to be.

Some do take my advice and start with a low impact or no-heat beginner’s class. In the 21 years that I have been doing and teaching yoga it has been my experience that everyone who I allowed to join my advanced classes as a beginner, don’t last and they never return to yoga. Those who stick are those whom I started out as beginners, I have build them up and slowly allow them to do more yoga. There is much to learn and to understand and this is the purpose of my beginner’s class, to slowly serve as an induction for at least a year into yoga and to build you up according to your body and where you are.

Here’s why new yogis need to start as beginners:

  1. Yoga is a skill you learn

If you were going to the gym for the first time, you can’t just walk in and start using the equipment and lifting 100kg weights, you will hurt yourself. Just as you need guidance and an instructor to show you how the equipment work and give you a plan according to which you must develop, the same goes for yoga. You need time to learn the asanas, the lingo, the rules and limitations of your body and this is a time consuming exercise.

During the first month or so of your yoga practice, you will be watching and learning more than ever before in your life. In the beginner’s class everybody is in the same boat, and this makes the class easier actually. Give your teacher a chance to show you, listen and learn and remember. Be patient. Be humble. Be present. Yoga, more than almost any other activity, is about non-competition. It’s about meeting your body where it’s at, no matter what anyone else around you is able to do.

  1. Yoga is different.

We are all beginners for the rest of our lives. I learn every week something new, as I grow older now, I have to learn how to adapt my practice to suit my body and age. There is no end goal in yoga. In the beginning you arrive at a class due to a back ache or you want to increase flexibility or you want to loose weight, doesn’t matter, be open, your expectations will change as you do yoga. Your learning curve is forever in yoga, there is no end to what you will discover and learn. Start at the very beginning and be ready to never stop learning. If you do anything less, you will be robbing yourself of the limitless lessons yoga has to offer.

  1. Yoga injuries suck.

Period. If you rush your own process, over-exert, ignore your pain, or compete with your classmates, you’ll almost certainly get hurt. And you’ll blame yoga, probably never return to it, and that will be a darn shame. The beginner class is sympathetic, it allow you to do what you can with what you have. There is now pushing, no forcing, just allowance for slow evolution at your own pace.

  1. The breath is the thing.

Pranayama is the in and out breaths I teach you with every asana. Most of us need to learn again how to just breathe in and out, this is a skill that you must re-learn again. Starting slow will prove that to you. A good beginner class instructor will remind you of the breath frequently, encourage you to return to your breath, and remind you to rest as much as you need.

  1. You risk missing the point.

When you start in an advanced or intermediate class you risk missing the point of yoga. An advanced class may be so intimidating, too much for you to take in that your mind and heart goes into shutdown mode and you miss the beauty of yoga. All you see and remember was how hard and difficult it was, the intense pain you experience two days later, resentment against me as a teacher because I don’t want to allow you to do more that once a week yoga and between all of this, you are missing the beauty of yoga. The purpose of yoga is to find focus. The purpose of finding focus is to find peace, and to keep growing within that new peace.

This isn’t to say that all the other things you thought yoga would do for you won’t come to pass. Because of yoga, I am stronger than I’ve ever been and rarely get injured anymore. Because of yoga I don’t have agonising back ache anymore and the list goes on.

But none of those things will happen if yoga becomes just another of a long list of things you “have to do” to lose 10 kilos or to heal your back. Who needs another one of those? If yoga becomes something you have to recover from because you over-did it, it can never become the wonderful nurturing thing you do for yourself.

And that’s what it’s supposed to be.

New Beginner’s Class 2019

Start 8 January 2018 | 17:30 – 19:00 | Queenswood, Pretoria | Cost R330 pm

To Enroll, send me an email from the Contact Page.

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